Salone

Beautiful Sierra Leone, its Cultures, Beaches and People

'Land that we love, Our Sierra Leone'
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Charlotte Falls By @VisitSL

old currency

Fishermen

Bureh Beach

Bureh

Lumley Beach

Mamah Beach

Okada Man

An Okada (motorcycle taxi) rider at Congo Cross

Under Congo Cross Bridge 

Family life in one of the settlements that have sprung up under Freetown’s bridges.

Inflatables

Tokeh

Tribewanted - John Obey Beach

Bureh, Sierra Leone

Who we are

Bureh Town is a beach community well on its way to becoming the kind of place a tourist never wants to leave. Our beach is pristine and we boast the best surfing along the coast.  Flop on the sand or in one of our beach shelters, tread water in the warm Atlantic, watch surfers ride the waves or ride the waves yourself!

We’re even busy developing a surf centre!

Ask for fresh fruit! Someone will scoot up a coconut tree for you, find you fresh mangoes, grill you a breadfruit or slice you a star-fruit (we call them karambula).

We support ourselves through tourism-related activities, small scale fishing (crab, lobster, shrimp and different varieties of fish such as snapper and barracuda), coal burning, woodcutting, gardening, farming, palm wine tapping and sand mining.  Like a number of other communities along the coast, some of us are also in the business of harvesting sea cucumbers (for mostly Chinese clients).

We are predominantly Sherbro followed by Temne and Mende.

History

In the past we made local gin called Omoley (you can still ask for it along the coast and someone is sure to find it for you).

Bureh has an interesting history. Our ancestors first settled in Wonpor, then moved to Triben (meaning “old town”) along the Bureh beach (Triben is now the site of our burial ground).  Eventually our ancestors made their way across the river encouraged by Pa Bureh, the founder of the village in its present location.

Local heroes: Pa Say Say and Pa Davies gave land for our school which was built by Lebanese Sierra Leoneans in exchange for touristic investment here in Bureh (though this development has still not taken place). Dave Douglas donated land for the church and was supportive of our youth.

Tokeh Beach

Baw Baw, Sierra Leone

Who we are

We are a small, culturally alive, predominantly Sherbro village on the spectacular peninsular beach.  We mainly support ourselves with fishing activities and some agricultural production.  We also do charcoal burning and woodcutting. We sell gari (ground dried cassava) and we grow rice. We have a very pretty natural harbour. Our beach is great for fishing, relaxing and buying fish.   

What makes our community stand out is our commitment to keeping our cultural practices alive! We have secret society bushes for both men and women and people from neighbouring villages come here to perform cultural activities.

But don’t let that frighten you away. We’d love to have you. We’ve recently, with the help of WHH (Welthungerhilfe) reinvigorated our cultural dance troupe. Ask us to perform for you. It would be our pleasure (and yours too, of course!)

History

Our village was founded by fishermen before the colonial era and the name “Baw Baw” means “if you can make it through” in Sherbro. We have historically supported ourselves with fishing and farming and continue to do so today.

Our local heroes: Our first community centre was constructed by Mr Samuel Gabbidon. Mr Samuel Praft constructed the road linking the village to the peninsula road. We very much admire our current village headman, Gibrilla Kargbo because he has done so much for our youth. He’s built them a boat and has been instrumental in bringing NGO assistance to improve the dam in the village. Mr Isaiah Palmer is also a local hero to us, not only because he brought religion to this community but because he developed a fishing method called “cast net fishing” – ask us about it and we’ll show you!